JR Raphael

Sync Dropbox and Android the smarter way

March 05, 2012 1:44 PM EST

By (@jr_raphael) G+

Dropbox and Android can be a powerful combination -- and all it takes is a teensy bit of tweaking to unlock their full potential.

Sync Dropbox Android

Dropbox, you see, actually has the ability to keep your Android device completely synced with any number of PCs, tablets, and phones. You can sync specific types of data or sync your device's entire storage. The options are practically endless; you just have to know where to find them.

The secret lies in the form of an unassuming little app called Dropsync. Dropsync works alongside the official Dropbox app to make it do everything you always wished it could do. I use Dropsync to keep all of my photos synced between my Android phone, a couple of Android tablets, and my PC; anytime I take or upload a new photo on any of those devices, it automatically shows up on the others.

That's not all, though: I also use Dropsync to sync several other types of data, like screenshots (when I capture one on a phone or tablet, it's automatically available on my PC), APK files (I save one to my phone and can pull it up on my tablet seconds later), and various types of app-specific settings (saved on one device and instantly available on all the others). The app adds an awesome layer of automation that lets me seamlessly move from one device to another without any thought or effort.

Dropsync's features are pretty robust compared to what you'll find in the main Dropbox app -- which, as of its most recent release, provides an optional one-way sync of photos and videos from your Android device to Dropbox. Dropsync, in comparison, adds true two-way synchronization into the equation: Files are synced both from your phone or tablet to Dropbox and from Dropbox to your phone or tablet. And rather than supporting only photos and videos, Dropsync lets you decide what folders will stay synced; there are no file-type limitations.

Dropbox Android Sync

Last but not least, Dropsync lets you command tight control over the syncing process: You can set limits for the size of files that'll be synced, set syncing to happen only when you're on Wi-Fi, and set syncing to happen only when your phone meets certain power conditions. The thing is just jam-packed with functionality.

Android Power TwitterDropsync is available as a free download in the Android Market. The free version allows you to sync a single folder at regular intervals. For the full, unlimited experience, you'll want to grab the Dropsync Pro Key, available for $5.99. That key opens up the app's complete set of features, including the ability to sync multiple folders and to have any changes be detected and synced instantly.

As far as Android apps go, it's certainly among the best six bucks I've spent.    

JR Raphael writes about smartphones and other tasty technology. You can find him on , Twitter, or Facebook.

Article copyright 2012 JR Raphael. All rights reserved.