No good deed goes unpunished

Pilot fish handles anything that has to do with computers for this family-run business, which provides business services for large public events -- one of which has a large problem.

"Days before a big ticketed event, I got a memo from a co-worker that the upcoming event was gone from the company's central database system," fish says. "Despite being out sick that day, I called in and conferenced the coworker and her supervisor, who's a member of the ruling family.

"While on the call, I saw that other events were missing from the system as well. I advised that the best procedure will be to restore from a recent hourly backup, which would require some minimal downtime to complete."

Supervisor's response: No. Work some different computer magic, she tells fish. But I can start the process right away with your authorization, fish says. No, supervisor says, don't do anything -- we'll just retype the missing info.

An hour later, fish's phone rings. It's the supervisor, who tells fish to restore that backup ASAP. Turns out she has also sent out a memo telling the staff there will be extended downtime, and no one can take ticket orders or even log into the CRM system until further notice.

Fish logs in, selects a recent backup, restores the data, restarts the web front end and has the system back up and running in minutes with all the lost data restored. Then he returns to his sickbed.

"But three hours later, that supervisor hadn't given the go-ahead for any staff to go back into the system," says fish. "The public was complaining that they couldn't register for our event, and an executive said the system would remain down until the next day 'as a precaution.'

"Despite my fixing the issue quickly, that evening I heard from one of the highest ranking people in the company. He said he was extremely disappointed in the lack of professionalism I showed by requiring so much time to restore the system -- and by being out sick on a day when I was needed."

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